April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 49

	

to understand her own tribe's history and the history of colonialism in
the United States, she became really
drawn to books about the Holocaust
that she could find in her school library. When she read those stories,
she saw in them the intergenerational trauma, [which] was something that she recognized in her own
communities but didn't yet have the
language for. And so, reading about
it in that other context helped her to
better understand what was happening...in her own community.
P&R: Stephanie, could you talk
a little bit about the Ho-Chunk
Nation's history, the land and
some of the key conservation
and environmental challenges
your tribe is currently facing?
Lozano: The Ho-Chunk land actually spanned from what is now Green
Bay (Wisconsin) to Minneapolis
(Minnesota), down to St. Louis and
up to Chicago. So, that was our original territory. Throughout the 1800s,
the federal government had a policy
of removal. They [wanted] to move
tribal people West. And my people
got removed from this plan several
times. There are differing accounts
of exactly how many times, but we
know that our people were moved to
Minnesota, the Dakotas, Iowa and,
eventually, Nebraska.
So, the Ho-Chunk people that
are here in Wisconsin are actually
the descendants of the ones that
continued to come back...or the
ones that never left. Sometimes,
they hid out and would avoid the
removals. When our last removal
was to Nebraska, a portion of our
family stayed there and a portion
of us came back. And now, we're
two separate tribes - federally
recognized. We have the same language, the same culture, the same
history, but we are counted as two

PHOTO COURTESY OF TANIA CORNELIUS

the importance of amplifying
contemporary, Indigenous voices to
help change the narrative for future
generations. Can you expand a
little bit on the importance of
amplifying these voices?
Sinclair: I think one of the things
that was really important for me
when I was working on the book is
that...the book should be a call to action. For non-Native readers, I wanted them to be able to contextualize
these issues within a much longer
historical context and within a much
broader sociological one. [Within]
the 12 narratives that are contained
in this book, there are people who
are working really actively to change
the narrative for future generations.
There are people who've experienced real challenges and injustice
in their own lives, but [also] there are
people who are actively working to
change that reality for future people.
[For example,] Marian Naranjo, who
is based in Santa Clara Pueblo (New
Mexico)..., was a victim of a secret
radiation experiment when she was
a young person. And today, she leads
her pueblo and surrounding pueblos
to do the rigorous work of filing environmental impact statements, to
make explicit what the consequences
of living near Los Alamos Nuclear
Laboratory are for her people, their
health and their sacred territories.
So, for non-Indigenous people, I
want them to have a lot more context
about the ongoing struggles that exist for Native people and [their] community to protect rights and life. And
then for Indigenous people, I think
a lot about...one of the first people
I interviewed for the book, Ashley
Hemmers. She's from the Fort Mojave Nation, which is a small nation where California, Nevada and
Arizona intersect. And, she spoke
about how before she became aware
of the resources that would help her

Stephanie Lozano, tribal liaison for the
Wisconsin Department of Children and
Families and a member of the Ho-Chunk
Nation.

different tribes. And I think it's this
piece for me, in terms of the land
that we're connected to and some
of the challenges that are faced. The
Ho-Chunk people have always considered themselves to be stewards
of the land. We are mindful of the
wildlife that is here and making sure
that things continue in harmony,
but I've not really heard about my
tribe facing a lot of environmental
challenges like some of the other
tribes with the pipelines and different things like that. I see us supporting other tribes and their struggles,
but I think a lot of it has to do with
some of the fierce advocates that we
have that are speaking on our behalf
on state and national levels.
And Ho-Chunk is actually in our
language and...means " people of
the big voice or people of the sacred
language. " So, we're kind of known
out there for being pretty outspoken
and pretty strong in our advocacy.

PA R K S A N D R E C R E AT I O N .O R G | A P R I L 2 02 1 |

Parks & Recreation

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April 2021 - Parks & Recreation

Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of April 2021 - Parks & Recreation

April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - Cover1
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - Cover2
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 1
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 2
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 3
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 4
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 5
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 6
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 7
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 8
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 9
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 10
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 11
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 12
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 13
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 14
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 15
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 16
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 17
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 18
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 19
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 20
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 21
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 22
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 23
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 24
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 25
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 26
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 27
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 28
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 29
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 30
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 31
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 32
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 33
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 34
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 35
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 36
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 37
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 38
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 39
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 40
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 41
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 42
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 43
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 44
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 45
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 46
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 47
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 48
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 49
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 50
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 51
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 52
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 53
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 54
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 55
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - 56
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - Cover3
April 2021 - Parks & Recreation - Cover4
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/july-2022
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/june-2022
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/may-2022
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/april-2022
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/march-2022
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/february-2022
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/january-2022
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/december-2021
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/november-2021
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/october-2021
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/september-2021
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/august-2021
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/july-2021
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/june-2021
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/may-2021
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/april-2021
https://ezine.nrpa.org/nrpa/ParksRecreationMagazine/march-2021
https://www.nxtbookmedia.com